Paul And The 'Inspiration' Of Scripture

In II Timothy 3:16, we read the claim of Paul:

“All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness.” (2 Timothy 3:16)

In the above verse, we clearly see that the entire Bible is supposed to be inspired from God Almighty. However, there are few problems with the claim.

Paul’s Dependency On Talmudic Writings: Evidence Of New Testament Borrowing

While Christians would prefer to allude to the notion that Paul, the self-acclaimed “apostle” of Jesus, was “inspired” when he wrote his epistles, the evidences we have researched states otherwise. We have seen how Paul had cited a verse from the “apocryphal books of Elijah” but claimed that he was citing from the book of Isaiah. Apparantly this citing of quotations from apocryphal or Rabbinic writings was not alien to Paul, for in the epistles of Paul, there are abundant signs that he was extremely familiar with Rabbanic material and constantly refers to them. This is not surprising since Paul himself had admitted to familiarity with Jewish traditions under the tutelage of Gamaliel (Acts 22:3).

Epimenides Paradox Revisited

In response to our argument that Paul’s fumbling of the Epimenides paradox is proof that the ad-hoc “apostle” was not inspired after all, one Christian has raised an objection. The attempted rebuttal acknowledges the paradoxical nature of Epimenides’ statement, but then makes the bizarre claim that Paul’s statement is true nonetheless due to other elements attributed to the Cretan “prophet” by the “apostle”.

‘The Apocryphal Books Of Elijah’ & Paul

In his First Epistle to the Corinthians, Paul says that

“However, as it is written: ‘No eye has seen, no ear has heard, no mind has conceived what God has prepared for those who love him.'” (1 Corinthians 2:9)

It is claimed that Paul had paraphrase the above citation from Isaiah:

“Since ancient times no one has heard, no ear has perceived, no eye has seen any God besides you, who acts on behalf of those who wait for him.” (Isaiah 64:4)

This is actually inaccurate, as Paul had actually quoted the above from the ‘apocryphal books of Elijah’ and not Isaiah 64:4. Apostolic Christians such as Origen and Jerome had confirmed the following about the source of Paul’s quote.