The Myth Of “The Myth Of Moderate Islam”

In a recent article in The Spectator magazine in the UK, the evangelical leader Patrick Sookhdeo takes a swipe at Muslims and their religion. Does his case stand up to scrutiny? Patrick Sookhdeo’s article (July 30, 2005) in London’s The Spectator, “The Myth of a Moderate Islam” reflects a dangerous trend in the war on terror. Under the guise of informing Westerners about Islam, he is in fact spreading the very same disinformation that anti-Islamic polemics have been based upon for over 1,000 years. This plays directly into the hands of Osama bin Laden, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi and others, for it encourages the “clash of civilizations” they so appallingly desire. It is indeed of the utmost importance that we learn more about Islam and fight the scourge of extremism with all the tools possible. But Sookhdeo and those like him corrupt this process, seeking to advance their own agenda by turning the war on terror into an ideological war against Islam.

What Should Be The Muslim Reaction To Christmas?

Alhamdulillah, all praise be to Allah alone, for making us Muslims and bestowing us the Deen of Islam to distinguish right and wrong. The holiday season is upon us again, and the ugly head of Satan is rising again to inspire people to indulge in innovation and shirk. What proceeds is an analytical view of Christmas and appropriate Muslim conduct during the Christmas season. Quite a number of Muslims today, especially those living in Christian-dominated countries or those influenced to a large degree by western culture, have been led to consider that taking part in the Christmas celebrations of friends and relatives is, at very least, a harmless past time if not a legitimate source of pleasure for children and adults alike. In many instances, pressure to conform with the practices of society is too great for those of weak resolve to withstand.

The Apotheosis Of Jesus Of Nazareth

A special “gift” for the Christian missionaries on occasion of Good Friday. I wish to show by an analysis of Wisdom Christology in Matthew’s gospel chapter 23, that the evangelist took the dramatic step of changing Jesus’ metaphysical status from creature to Creator by altering the Q tradition, and to reflect on the theological implications of this metamorphosis for Christianity, and where we go from here.

Islam and Christianity

Islam And Co-Existence

The Interfaith Coalition of Nashville organized this year’s interfaith conference in the Vanderbilt University, Nashville, USA. Judaism was represented by Dr. Donna Whitney, Christianity by Dr. Tom Davis, Hinduism by Dr. Howard J. Resnick (HD Goswami), and Buddhism by Professor Win Myint. Dr. Habib Siddiqui represented Islam. This is the transcript of his speech on Islam.

The conference was opened by Dr. Jawaid Ahsan. Dr. Charles Hembrick, Professor Emeritus of Religion at Vanderbilt University, moderated the conference.

A Logical Reasoning Refuting The Concept Of Trinity

In this paper I attempt to present an argument disputing and refuting the Christian Belief in the Trinity of God. We believe this ill concept was inserted into Christian belief by the devil at a time of absence of mind and a state of powerlessness on the part of true unitarians and sincere believers in the One God. To this day, followers of this belief are faithful to the evil that founded it and we are aware that there is little or no benefit in attempting to argue them out of this line of thought. However, we are like that who is describing the sorry state of a lost and misguided person to people so that others may take example and lesson from it. And Allah shall guide whom He chooses to the right path.

Hans Kung’s Theological Rubicon

In Hans Kung’s address to this conference he has once again proven himself a pioneer of interreligious dialogue. What he has been doing throughout most of his theological career, he was doing again-exploring new territory, raising new questions in the encounter of Christianity with other religions. Although Kung made his greatest contribution in the inner-Christian, ecclesial arena, he has always realized-and increasingly so in more recent years-that Christian theology must be done in view of, and in dialogue with, other religions. As he has said, Christians must show an increasingly “greater broad-mindedness and openness” to other faiths and learn to “reread their own history of theological thought and faith” in view of other traditions. As a long-time reader of Kung’s writings, and as a participant with him in a Buddhist-Christian conference in Hawaii, January 1984, I have witnessed how much his own broad-mindedness and openness to other religions has grown. He has been changed in the dialogue.